Song Lyrics

Heart Wings

Heart Wings offers a harvest of songs that celebrate the human spirit. I created this recording while being trained as an Interfaith Minister and Peace Chaplain at the Chaplaincy Institute of Maine (ChIME). At the time of my ordination in June 2009, this new recording was released.

Songwriting is for me a sacred journey to a deep wellspring. Jacob Watson, founder and Abbot of the school, has said, “There is something deep inside us that keeps speaking.”  

The place that keeps speaking. This place was validated and nourished at the Chaplaincy Institute of Maine. Songs even welled up in my sleep. One night I heard Jacob’s words sung in a tune, and it became the chorus of a song. Jacob says about the school, “Here we are learning ministry from the inside out.” This delicious process of seeking Source and speaking from our depths helped new songs to flow.

During these two years of study many songs arrived – probably close to seventy. My other newest recording – “Pocketful of Wonder” – collects another group of these new songs– the ones for children. It is produced and recorded by A Gentle Wind and is due out this summer.
           
            Thanks to Marc Lisle: graphic design and photography.
            Scott Sibley: Rainbow Sounds engineer
            Sue Kranz: flute and harmony vocals.
            David Fersh: guitar (songs 3, 8, 11), harmony.
            Chris Manchester: guitar (song 9)
            Ryan Pirtle-McVeigh: piano (song 9)

All proceeds from this recording go to support “Holding the Light” programs that offer spiritual and social healing for people who have experienced severe trauma.

COMING BACK TO LIFE

Source:
Words and music by Sarah Pirtle,
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Additional lyrics: Maria Lugones from her book Pilgrimages, Peregrinajes,
and conversation with Sherry Ensarro, Marisa Brown-Ludwig, Terry Foley, Deirdre Griffin, Heidi Mendez, and Natalie Cain.

Summary: Transformative truth-telling friendships

COMING BACK TO LIFE

Chorus:
And I will know my voice as I speak it.
And I will make the bridge as I meet it.
Speaking face to face in a place unbroken.
Speaking face to face in a circle that is open.

Bridge:
Resucita conmigo y llámame por mi misma.
Come back to life with me and call me for myself.

1. Sometimes grace is a fire, sometimes a drop of water.
We come to tend the fire, transformation's daughters.

2. Drawn like spokes of a wheel to a deeper center,
We're mid-wives of a flame. We must enter.

Bridge:
Resucita conmigo y llámame por mi misma.
Come back to life with me and call me for myself.

Coming back to life!

Background of the Song:

This song is inspired by the charism of the Sisters of Saint Joseph, going back to the 1600’s, which is to focus upon our oneness with the dear neighbor. After I led a day-long Interfaith program for Women’s Spirituality Day at Mt. Marie in Holyoke, MA, I became better acquainted with the Sisters of Saint Joseph.  I attended a retreat with agrégées, women who are not part of the canonical church but vow to live the charism. During the retreat, when we spoke about what is central in our lives, this song burst forward, woven with words from several of the women. One person had brought a book that ignited new realizations. A section from the author became a centerpoint for the song:

          Resucita conmigo y llámame por mi misma.
          Come back to life with me and call me for myself.
          from Maria Lugones in Pilgrimages, Peregrinajes, p. 43

The phrase in the first verse, “transformation’s daughters,” certainly also applies to the many spiritual groups with women I’ve experienced, with special thanks to my cohort classmates Denise DeSimone, Jan Gurley, Lillian Reilly, Meg Mulligan, and Shari Rose at the Chaplaincy Institute of Maine.

Back to top

HOLDING THE LIGHT

Source:
Music by Sarah Pirtle, and words by Sarah Pirtle
with first verse by Isolina Leiva Bowes and second verse
including a phrase from Rabindranath Tagore.

© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary: Tasting the essence of spiritual support  

HOLDING THE LIGHT

Chorus: We are holding the light. We are holding the light.
          We are holding the light, hold on.

1. One single blade of grass can hold a thousand stories.
One single falling leaf can sing a million songs,
And one single person can change the world just by being born. 
         (this verse from a poem by Isolina Leiva Bowes)

2. One single soaring bird can bring the sky a blessing.
One single weary traveler can watch her in her flight.
Hope is the bird that lives in the heart
And sings when the dawn is still night.    
          (last two lines from a poem by Rabindranath Tagore—
           his words are “sings when the dawn is still dark.”)

3. One single hidden seed can open up a garden.
One single patch of ground can call forth a new birth.
And when we walk forward and speak our truth,
We create more love on Earth.

Background of the Song:

 “Holding the Light” programs offer spiritual support for healing the social wounds of trauma. This work is based upon the belief that we each have our own wellspring of spiritual courage. A key insight is that what makes the difference under the challenge of violence is to find a spiritual way to GET BIGGER. The phrase “holding the light” means seeing each other whole and supporting transformation.

In preparing to lead a day-long program of Holding the Light, I took two favorite poems and pieced them like a quilt. A Journey Camp staff member named Isolina Leiva-Bowes wrote a poem in the woods of camp when she was a teenager, and I’d put it to music. (See the song “Believe” on Everyday Bravery). When I was a teenager, I loved that quote from Tagore. They are part of the song’s tapestry.

Back to top

FREEMAN

Source:
Words and music by Sarah Pirtle,
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary: Civil Rights story of meeting hatred with non-violence.

FREEMAN              

1. He was marching down the street singing, “Freedom”
with hundreds of children side by side,
Singing out for Civil Rights, holding up their inner light,
there in Birmingham like a rising tide.
He was marching down the street singing, “Freedom.”
He was walking in his Sunday best. He was just 12 years of age,
and he did not feel afraid. Though all us knew we’d soon face a test.

Chorus:  We were singing freedom, We were singing freedom.
Freedom means justice. That’s what my parents say.
In my heart I am free to know we are one family.
And I believe we will find freedom today.

2.  Like his grandfather, his name was “Freeman.”
Tell the world, he (his grandfather) never was a slave.
And that name kept him strong. His ancestors lived on,
in that 1963 Children’s Crusade.

Bridge: Then Bull Conner blocked the way,
the chief of those who’d want to stop us.
Freeman kneeled in prayer on the steps of City Hall.
Bull’s voice rang like a drum.
He growled at him, “Why have you come?”
He spat in his face. Freeman did not fall.
He said, “I am here for my Freedom.” Freedom, freedom, I say.
Then a thought came big and great,
“I have the freedom not to hate.
And I truly found my freedom that day.”

Chorus: We’re singing Freedom. We’re singing Freedom.
Freedom means justice. That’s what my parents say.
In my heart I am free to know we are one family.
And I truly got my freedom that day.

3. Behind him, people sang out, “Freedom.”
They wanted him to know he’s not alone.
When someone wants us afraid, we will not be a slave.
Inside of our heart is freedom’s home.

CHORUS

Background of the Song:

This song is dedicated to Freeman A. Hrabowski, III,  President of UMBC (The University of Maryland, Baltimore County). This tells the true story of the time he as a boy encountered Bull Connor during the Children’s Crusade, and it shares the words he said in response.

Wikipedia said: “The Children's Crusade was the name bestowed upon a march by hundreds of school students in Birmingham, Alabama, on May 2 and May 3, 1963, during the American Civil Rights Movement. Organized by Rev. James Bevel, the purpose of the march was to protest the arrest and jailing of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Many kids escaped from their school in order to be arrested, set free then arrested the next day.”

The summer of 2007 I heard Freeman speak when he was a commencement speaker at my son’s college graduation. Here is Freeman’s favorite quote that he shared at Haverford College in his talk.

                               Watch your thoughts,
                               For they become your words.
                               Watch your words
                               For they become your actions.
                               Watch your actions
                               For they become your habits.
                               Watch your habits
                               For they become your character.
                               Watch your character,
                               For it becomes your destiny.

Back to top

LOVE WILL GUIDE YOU

Source:
Words and music by Sarah Pirtle,
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary: Song of ever-present Spirit

LOVE WILL GUIDE YOU

1. There is a place inside the heart where the flying bird rests,
    a sturdy place inside the heart where the bird can make its nest.
    We are safe beyond all knowing, we are made for this growing.
    Thanks be to life, thanks be to life.

Chorus: Love will guide you.
Love’s inside you every step of the way.
    Love will guide you. Love’s inside you every step of the way.

2.  There is a place inside the dream where the bird says—Join the sky.
     You have those wings inside of you and it’s time for you to fly.
     We are safe beyond all knowing, we are made for this growing.
     Thanks be to life, thanks be to life.

Chorus: Love will guide you.
Love’s inside you every step of the way.
    Love will guide you. Love’s inside you every step of the way.

Closing:  Hear our heart’s song, hear our heart’s song.
               Thanks be to life.

Background of the Song:

I like how songs can be seeds. Just as seeds carry the pattern of a plant, songs can carry the medicine of spiritual discoveries. I heard portions of this song – words and tune – in dreams. I wanted to create a song that brought comfort.

While studying at the Chaplaincy Institute of Maine, Shari Rose and I were partners creating a worship service. I want to thank her for helping to make up motions to words of the first verse. We led it as a Body Prayer as described below.

BODY PRAYER

Here are the words and gestures to the body prayer.
The person leading it doesn't have to remember the tune --
It can also be shared as a spoken poem.

THANKS BE TO LIFE

There is a place inside the heart
       Start hands at solar plexis and circle
       open to rest crossed on the heart.

where the flying bird rests,
       Open your hands, turning palms out and fly up.
       Then rest hands side by side, palms up, at waist.

a sturdy place inside the heart
where the bird can make its nest.
        Swing hands back and forward.
        Return with holding open circle.

We are safe beyond all knowing.
We are made for this growing.
        As if holding a circle,
        rotate the circle around to the left and back.
        Two times

Thanks be to life.
        Make an L with your hands.
        Point the L toward the earth,
        then draw it up through your torso to point at the sky.

Thanks be to life.
        End with hands pressed together

Back to top

KNOCK ON THE WALL

Source:
Words and music by Sarah Pirtle,
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary:  The underground railroad and the solidarity of heart

KNOCK ON THE WALL

Chorus: Knock on the wall and tell me you are safe tonight.
I wish that you had a window to see the stars so bright.
One knock says keep hidden.
Two more say danger’s gone.
Five knocks say let’s visit today.
Will you teach me your favorite song?

Refrain: Knock on the wall. Knock on the wall.
             Knock on the wall. Knock on the wall.

1. I met a new friend. She escaped up north. 
She arrived on a moonless night.
Hidden in a wagon with her Mama and her aunt.
Seekers of freedom kept out of sight.
I brought her pumpkin pie.
And she showed me a string game.
And we each had a doll made by my ma,
and our ages were the same.   

Refrain: Knock on the wall. Knock on the wall.
             Knock on the wall. Knock on the wall.

Chorus: Knock on the wall and tell me you are safe tonight.
I wish that you had a window to see the stars so bright.
One knock says keep hidden. Two more say danger’s gone.
Five knocks say, let’s visit today.
Will you teach me your favorite song?

2. She taught me Little Johnny Brown.
And I taught Go Round the Sun.
And together we made a hand clap game
that we called Day is Done.
And one night I brought her a message
by the door down under the stair.
I heard it’s true a wagon’s coming through.
My Dad said you’ll ride there. 

Refrain

3. I sat in front with my father and you hid behind in the straw.
Now you’ve got two dolls named Juniper
and a good-luck rabbit’s paw.
When we got to the river, there was a boat and raft.
We found the landing and I hugged you tight
and I watched but you couldn’t look back.  

Ending: Cross the water, I want to shout.
Cross the water, I say.
I know you’re holding Juniper, and you’re heading far away.
Cross the water, I want to shout. There is magic here I know.
You’re gonna make it to Canada. My heart tells me so.   
Knock on the wall, knock on the wall.

Background of the Song:

People of western Massachussetts were an active part of the underground railroad. The small town of Charlemont – the next town west from where I live – was a central spot in helping Seekers of Freedom escape to Canada.

Two librarians from Charlemont, Bambi Miller and Mary Boehmer, have been researching this local history for twenty years. Their research told of local women making dolls for children escaping, and I added that detail to the song. They said it would be unusual for a daughter to know that her parents were involved – as this song portrays – but possible.

I learned that the house almost next to mine and the river across the street were part of the Underground Railroad. This holds great meaning for me.

Back to top

TERESA OF AVILA'S PRAYER

Source:
Music and new arrangement by Sarah Pirtle,
based upon a prayer by Teresa of Avila.
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary: Teresa’s prayer put into song.

ORIGINAL PRAYER BY TERESA OF AVILA

May today there be peace within.
May you trust God
That you are exactly where you are meant to be.
May you not forget the infinite possibilities
That are born of faith.
May you use those gifts that you have received,
And pass on the love that has been given to you.
May you be content
Knowing you are a child of God.
Let this presence settle into your bones
And allow your soul the freedom
To sing, dance, praise and love.
It is there for each and every one of us.

SONG LYRICS

1) May today there be peace within.
May today there be peace within.
May you trust God you’re exactly where you’re meant to be.
And hold the faith born of infinite possibility.
May today there be peace within.

(2) May today there be love within.
May today there be love within.
May you pass on the love that’s been given to you,
And use the gifts you’re received that they keep shining through.
May today there be love within.
And may this presence settle in your bones.
And let this presence make for you a home.
May today there be love within.

(3) May today there be trust within.
May today there be trust within.
May a voice inside you speak kind and loud.
May you rest contented as a child of God.
May today there be trust within.

(4) May today you be free within.
May today you be free within.
And may this presence bring freedom to your soul
To sing and dance and praise and love the whole.
May today you be free within.

Background of the Song: 

I tried to memorize a prayer by Teresa of Avila because I found it very strengthening. I suddenly thought – what would it be like to put it to music? Then it would be something I could carry inside and remember, and it might also be enjoyed by others.

The songwriting challenge was to stay true to the prayer. I had to reconfigure it so that there was a pattern. So I created four sections and a summary phrase starting each section. There was only one rhyme already in the prayer, so I created others. I hope the spirit of her prayer has been kept intact.

Back to top

FIRE TALK

Source:
Words and music by Sarah Pirtle,
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary:  A vision quest filled with the power of the bear.

FIRE TALK

1. Paddle to the west on this vision quest. My canoe is taking flight.
I am an empty bowl, wanting to be whole. Ready for new sight.
Firekeeper… firekeeper.  (2x)

2. A chickadee’s song guided me along to where birch bark lay.
I built up a fire, set the water boiling higher. The bark softened right away.

Chorus:  Singing out with the otter, and the chickadee.
Reaching far with the wild geese in flight.
What will this basket hold for me? I dream in the forest tonight.

REFRAIN:   Firekeeper with the bowdrill turning.      
    Firekeeper with the flames a-burning            
    Firekeeper, ancient learning.  Fire talk. 

3. With a needle made of bone, step by step it was sewn
as I sang what old women have sung.
With tallow from my pack, I greased the seams in back.
I said this basket’s done.

Chorus:  Resting there with the otter, and the chickadee.
Sleeping sound like the wild geese at night.
In the morning I’ll return to my family as sun fills my basket with light.

Firekeeper…firekeeper. Fire talk!

4. I awoke before dawn and found my basket gone,
and the berries I had saved.
The signs of a bear told me who’d been there.
I followed its trail toward a cave.

Chorus:  Tracking sure with the otter, and the chickadee.
Moving on with the wild geese on high.
And the chickadee’s song said your basket is not gone.
You can track it. You can try.

5. I found each broken piece. It was torn by bear cub teeth.
The bear had let it go.
Should I throw it down again? Or should I start to mend?
I will make it whole.

Firekeeper, firekeeper. Fire talk.
Firekeeper with the bowdrill turning.
Firekeeper with the flames a-burning           
Firekeeper, ancient learning.  Fire talk.
          
6. Canoe in the dawn, go with the river’s song. I leave this vision quest.
    I was an empty bowl. My vision kept me whole, and now I take my rest.

Paddle home with the otter and the chickadee.
Rolling home with the wild geese in air.
I bring this birch basket touched and changed,
filled with the power of the bear.
filled with the power of the bear.

Background of the Song:

I feel affinity with the Pocumtuck people, the first people of this region, and I think about them often. The river outside my window is where I picture a girl paddling on her vision quest. A few years ago I learned how to use a bowdrill and also how to make a birch basket around a campfire by boiling water to soften the bark and lashing it together with sinew.

Last winter this song began to form itself. As I followed it down, I was actually surprised by what happened – that the basket was gone in the morning. I kept staying with the story and letting it unfold, like a quest itself. I dream about bears and feel affinity with their medicine.

On the recording a friend named Sue Kranz plays her flute like a spirit companion and made astonishing music to augment the story.

Back to top

MY FATHER'S HEART

Source:
Words and music by Sarah Pirtle,
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary: Song of sacred masculinity inspired by Matthew Fox

MY FATHER’S HEART

1. It’s our favorite book. It’s called, “The Birds of the Sky.”
I know lots of words now. Dad points, and I give them a try.
He says, I’ve got wings. He says that he knows I can fly.
My father’s heart.

CHORUS:  My father’s heart is as big as the sky.
My father’s heart is as sweet as a tree.
My father’s heart is as brave as the sea.
He’s always with me. My father’s heart.

2. He butters two bagels and spreads on grape jelly, cream cheese.
We laze around. I can pick all the games that I please.
I say—Let’s go climbing—and we head up in the trees.     
My father’s heart.             CHORUS

3. My father told me how he felt the day I was born.
How he never knew he could love anybody that strong.
When he looks at me, I know where I’ll always belong.
In my father’s heart.         CHORUS

4. I tell my Dad that there is a choice that I’ve made.
I pretend he’s beside me whenever I feel afraid.
His love surrounds me like I am safe in a cave.  My father’s heart.

CHORUS:  My father’s heart is as big as the sky.
My father’s heart is as sweet as a tree.
My father’s heart is as brave as the sea.
He’s always with me. My father’s heart.

Background of the Song:

When theologian Matthew Fox spoke at the Chaplaincy Institute of Maine (ChIME) about sacred masculinity, he invited us to find ways to bring this awareness to children. Immediately I began to make notes for the song and worked on it that night. The next week I sang it for a father and son, and the boy kept saying, “That’s a great song.” I could see how much he loved his Dad, and was glad that it moved him to have this love affirmed.

I turn to Father Joseph, the father of Jesus, as a Spiritual Father, and often picture him with me. I dedicate the song to the men I know in ChIME -- to Jacob Watson and Joel Grossman as well as Matthew Fox.

When I was nineteen, I was first involved in the feminist movement and had the opportunity to go to a high school and talk about the essence of partnership – of women and men supporting each other. I remember a friend at People’s Music Network wearing a T shirt saying, “Men are Good,” and how it moved me to hear about his dedication to transforming sexism.

Back to top

THIS RIVER

Source:
Words and music by Sarah Pirtle,
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary: The home of the Pocumtuck people

THIS RIVER SPEAKS TO ME

1. A red-shouldered hawk is flying across
    and the salmon still jump up beside
    when I picture this river with the old ones who lived here.
    I see through their eyes as I glide.

Refrain:    This heritage river
     This long tidal river
                 There is no doubt this river speaks to me.

2. I head out in the morning as the first light is dawning
    I feel the Pocumtucks on shore.
    They knew all the fish here, birch baskets they dipped here.
    They tell us keep loving her more.            
           Refrain

3. From the border of Canada to Long Island Sound:
    four hundred miles on course.    
    They dammed it, and they dumped it, and they turned their backs from it.
    Today we go back to the source.               
           Refrain

4. The long-eared owl and the water fowl
    ask if the shad are returning.   
    I paddle, and I find a way to dream years ahead today,
    When the children thank us for our turning …to this heritage river…Refrain.

5. Tell me, what-- what is a river?
    Is it more than the banks of the water?
    Does it hold the future of sons and daughters?
    There is no doubt this river speaks to me.                     

Closing refrain:  This heritage river, Connecticut River.

    This heritage river, Connecticut River.

    There is no doubt, this river speaks to me.

Background of the Song:

Our regional Watershed Council wanted to create more dialogue about the Connecticut River by starting a song contest for songs about the river. I researched information about the Connecticut and pictured what it would look like when the Pocumtuck’s paddled there. Birds like the red-shouldered hawk and fish like the shad who are now endangered species are mentioned in the song. My son Ryan and one of his best friends Chris Manchester played guitar and piano on the entry, and it became a family project. The idea of talking about this region we love so much through a song, and then through the contest hearing how others translated their love for the river into words, not only melted away the designations of winners and losers, but resulted in a heart-opening experience.

Back to top

THE BOWL

Source:
Words and music by Sarah Pirtle,
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary: Approaching life like a receptive bowl

SONG OF THE ORDINATION BOWL                    

 (1) What fills this bowl, what fills this bowl
Comes from a cherished place.
And silence, awe, and mystery
Are welcomed in this space.
And so I bring a prayer to you
Of waiting, hope and grace,
For emptiness of fertile fields
Invites us to embrace.

Refrain: I hold this bowl. I hold this bowl.
              I hold this bowl.  I hold this bowl.

(2) We greet the season of our souls,
a season of surprise.
For we are like a garden bed
Awaiting to arise.
And we are like a sounding bowl  that listens faithfully
And in the silence of the earth awakes to mystery.

Refrain: I hold this bowl. I hold this bowl.
              I hold this bowl.  I hold this bowl.

Background of the Song:

At the Interfaith Ordination at the Chaplaincy Institute of Maine, Rev. Jacob Watson carefully prepares a wooden bowl swirled with wood grain for each person being ordained. He burnishes the bowls, carves the names and date on the bottom, prays over them, and then presents them at the ceremony.

My teacher Rev. Helen Rankin brought her ordination bowl to the opening ceremony the first weekend in 2008. In having a chance to work with her, this song was born. I wanted to explore the meaning of us being empty bowls open to the what the year would bring. Each person in the circle took a turn holding the bowl as the song was sung.

Back to top

HEART WINGS

Source:
Music by Sarah Pirtle,
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

This selection on the recording is harp music.

Back to top

CHIME KEEPS SPEAKING

Source:
Words and music by Sarah Pirtle,
With additional words by Jacob Watson, first line of chorus.
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary: Jacob Watson’s words put into song.

CHIME KEEPS SPEAKING

CHO. There is something deep inside us that keeps speaking,
that keeps speaking when we don’t know what to say.
There is something deep inside us that keeps repeating,
Spirit finds a way.

1. Chime of ancient voices and meeting common streams.
finding fuller choices made of grit and moonbeams.
Holding us in our deepest dreams.

LONGER CHORUS:
There is something deep inside me that keeps speaking.
That keeps speaking when I don’t know what to say.
There is something deep inside me that hears the weeping
And never turns away.
There is a source at my core.
There is a place that knows I’m whole.
New life has come….
New life has come, new life has come.

2. Chime, our soul’s wonder, through lightning and the thunder
  We are journeying in that garden place.
  We are blessing, we are blessing each beloved face.

Final Chorus:
There is something deep inside us that keeps speaking,
That keeps speaking when we don’t know what to do.
There is something deep inside us that keeps repeating,
Light is coming through.

There is a source at my core.
There is a place that knows I’m whole.
New life has come….
New life has come, new life has come.

Background of the Song:

The acronym of the Chaplaincy Institute of Maine is Chime which is a fitting metaphor for what happens during the school -- the chime of awakening. As I was driving to the last Wednesday night class, I wanted to bring a song as a gift, and the verses got created.

Early in the fall 2007, I remember Abbot Jacob Watson saying the words – there is something inside us that keeps speaking. I wrote this down, and I believe that one of the times of hearing music in sleep was of that tune coming. After the death of a beloved teacher, Michael Dwinell, I thought about his teachings that it’s our ever-growing relationship to the Divine that changes us. I kept working with the first line and completing the chorus until the various parts came together.

Back to top

THIS SONG IS FOR ED

Source:
Words and music by Sarah Pirtle,
© 2009 Discovery Center Music, BMI

Summary: Memorial Service song for a beloved friend, Ed Softky.

THIS SONG IS FOR ED:  YOU BRING MORE LOVE 

1. I think about your garden with the purple amaranth.
You liked to sleep outside there, then leap up like a Morris dance.
How your face lit up, and you laughed so loud
like a rose in a garden bed,
that again we say to each other, we want to be like Ed.     

Chorus: You bring more love. You bring more love.
You bring more love. You bring more love.
And, yes the love does count. Yes, the love does show.
Yes, the love does reach inside where something more will grow.
You bring more love. You bring more love.

2. A door fell off its hinges, a clock fell to the ground.
A radio on the day you died all at once turned on.
We prayed to you in Tibetan, we prayed all through the night.
A candle set for just one day kept sending out its light. 

Chorus: You bring more love. You bring more love.
You bring more love. You bring more love.

3. When we sing, we sing to you. It’s another way to pray.
We look for you in the next chair. You’re not far away.
You tell us there is golden light, and there is so much more.
Love goes on and comfort comes from each side of the door.

Refrain:
We bring more love. We bring more love.
And, yes the love does count. Yes, the love does show.
Yes, the love does reach inside where something more will grow.
We bring more love, we bring more love.
We bring more love.

Background of the Song:

The sudden death of my beloved friend Ed Softky in October 2008 felt impossible and unbearable. As friends of Ed gathered, we all agreed – we want to be like Ed. We want to have his generosity, his wisdom, and his joy in living.

Ed was a genius who deeply loved life and expressed it in Tibetan translating, Morris Dancing, creating harmony for songs, and gardening.

Back to top